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Uganda Atlas of Changing Evironment

FACTSHEET OF UGANDA ATLAS of OUR CHANGING ENVIRONMENT 2009
Environment conservationists and Ugandans in general are blessed with yet a new environmental atlas, the first of its kind, the Uganda Atlas of Our Changing Environment. This atlas is a unique publication by the Government of Uganda, modeled after the Africa Atlas of Our Changing Environment that was published by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). Produced with support from UNEP, the atlas seeks to safeguard the country’s environment and inspire decision makers to action. In line with the One Planet One People theme, Uganda in its natural splendour is undoubtedly the Pearl of Africa.
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HIGHLIGHTS OF UGANDA ATLAS of OUR CHANGING ENVIRONMENT ON FOREST COVER
The current overall national rate of deforestation is about 2%, but some parts of the country are losing their forest cover at higher rates than others (NFA 2006). Analysis shows that Mayuge District has lost all its forest cover. Mayuge is followed by Wakiso which has a deforestation rate of 86.7%, Mubende (79.0 %), Mityana (59.6%) and Kibaale (48.9%) respectively. The leading cause of deforestation is increased demand for agricultural land, charcoal and fuel wood by the rapid population growth
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HIGHLIGHTS OF UGANDA ATLAS of OUR CHANGING ENVIRONMENT ON FOREST COVER
Uganda has extensive wetland coverage, although the information about the exact size and distribution is yet to be established. Current estimates put the total area of wetlands at 33,000 Km2 covering about 13% of the country’s total area. Wetlands perform important chemical, hydrological, ecological and social economic functions. The major functions and values include; source of products such as water, fish, forage and grazing resources, wood fuel, building and craft materials, sand, clay and medicines; provision of services such as purification of water through filtering of both silt, and industrial and domestic affluent; regulate water flow and enhance ground water recharge; moderation of climate; retention of carbon; and provision of landscape aesthetic resources for recreation and eco- tourism.
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HIGHLIGHTS OF UGANDA ATLAS of OUR CHANGING ENVIRONMENT ON KAMPALA
Kampala District is estimated to cover an area of 197km2 and has remained the capital city since 1969 with an annual population growth rate of 5.61%. With this growth rate, Kampala absorbs 40% of the national urban population and 4.9% of the national population (UBOS, 2002). Population has increased from 774,241 in 1991 to 1.2 million in 2002 (UBOS 2002). These population figures reflect the night populations but the estimates show that the populations double during the day because many people travel to the city for work and business and return to their homes outside the city at the end of the day
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FACTSHEET OF UGANDA ATLAS of OUR CHANGING ENVIRONMENT 2009
Fresh water lakes occupy 36,280 km2 (15%) of Uganda. Lake Victoria is the largest in Uganda and the world’s second largest fresh water. This water is used in several ways: domestic consumption in rural and urban areas, industry, agriculture, wildlife, and transport and power generation. In addition, the open water bodies and wetlands are home to rich biodiversity including fisheries resources. Lakes have varying depths which have important bearing on the water storage capacity and sensitivity to reduction of the storage due to the increasing problem of silting.
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Highlights

Reports....
The current report presents the condition of the environment and natural resources in Uganda and is divided into four sections.
Sensitivity Atlas ...
An environmental oil spill sensitivity atlas has been prepared to provide environmental planners with tools to identify resources at risk....